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The Missionary Position
Main image for event The Missionary Position
$12
Sat, Apr 13 @ 8pm - midnight.
Itís not every day that one thinks of The Doors, Morphine, and George Clinton when describing a band. Moody and ambient, smooth yet edgy, funky with a nasty sense of humor Ė thatís an unlikely mix, and a lot for one act to carry off. But on their second full-length record, Consequences, thatís exactly what The Missionary Position does. All of that, and they bring the rock.

Headed up by singer and guitarist Jeff Angell, The Missionary Position formed three years ago, hard on the heels of the dissolution of Angellís former band, the critically acclaimed local favorite Post Stardom Depression. Looking for a new musical medium to showcase his killer voice and expand his sonic palette, Angell began working with keyboard player and production wizard Benjamin Anderson. The result of their collaboration was 2009ís Diamonds in A Dead Sky, which garnered praise nationally and throughout the Seattle music community by authorities such as Hannah Levin, who wrote in THE
SEATTLE WEEKLY that on Diamonds, the band "sounds like semi-destructive, erotic alchemists... we're talking straight-forward, blues-based hard rock, with slivers of psychedelia stuck under its fingers, but the easy soul and libidinous swagger pushing behind it is what sets The Missionary Position apart from your average bar band." THE BOISE WEEKLYís Amy Atkins wrote "Diamonds is swampy, blues-based, soulful guitar rock with enough electronic ripples to lend it a menacing air. It's a modern take on Blues, with the occasional haunting chorus in the background, minor chords, metronome-precise rhythms and an arms-open-wide attitude toward electronics, horns, woodwinds, keyboards and feedback. Add Angell's gritty vocals to the
mix and the whole album is as dense as a warm front."

No small praise for a band to live up to when theyíre making their second crucial album. The Missionary Position, which these days consists of Angell, Anderson, Gregor Lothian (saxophone), and Michael Alex (drums), thrived on the challenge, and
Consequences builds beautifully on the foundation that Diamonds established. Angell explains that playing hundreds of shows on the road supporting their debut streamlined the band for the recording process: "The last record was more of a collaboration
between Ben and myself with help from our friends. This record is really more of a band effort." Having a full band, the songs came about in a more organic way: "We played a lot live and got to know what was working." It shows Ė tracks such as "Everything All Over Me" and "Please Donít Leave" have the full-tilt thrust of four guys locked together in sonic purpose and power.

While Angell has assembled a crack team of compelling pros to bring the serpentine stomp, heís the lynchpin of the band, a natural-born front man whose lived-in voice is reminiscent of Rod Stewart and Otis Redding. Though love songs such as
"When I Fall Apart" and "How It Feels" bare teeth, they are perched on a precipice of vulnerability and sorrow. You donít doubt the sincerity behind the heartache for one measure. And onstage, well, heís a writhing, stomping, caterwauling piece of work
Ė no surprise that he was nominated for best male vocalist in the Seattle Weekly. Heís the real item. And so is The Missionary Position.